Ryan Lochte’s Father — Recently Retired Swim Coach Steven Lochte — Is a New Addition to the U.S. Center for SafeSport’s Little-Noticed ‘Interim Suspension’ List

Published September 15th, 2018, Uncategorized

by Irvin Muchnick

 

Steven Lochte, a Florida swimming coach and the father of notorious Olympic swimmer and multiple medalist Ryan Lochte, landed this week on the disciplinary records page of the U.S. Center for SafeSport. As of September 12, the senior Lochte is on “Interim Suspension” for “Allegations of Misconduct,” per the listing below, which was captured from a search under “swimming” at https://safesport.org/userviolations/search.

 

Steven Lochte          Interim Measure – Suspension

Swimming

Decision date            09/12/2018

Allegations of Misconduct                     Interim Suspension

 

The searchable interim measure page at the SafeSport site is a publicly accessible resource whose findings, nonetheless, have not been reported by the sport’s basic news outlets, such as SwimSwam.com. Concussion Inc. will have more to say about this feature in ongoing coverage.

With characteristic and convenient timing for some coaches under scrutiny by SafeSport, Steven Lochte, who is 66, already had announced his retirement from coaching in July. He was a coach USA Swimming’s Daytona Beach Speed club.

In 2010 Lochte had left his position as head coach at Daytona State College after an arrest for driving while intoxicated and revelations that his program had not appropriately monitored the posting of racist material on walls near the swimming pool.

Three years later, Steven Lochte and his ex-wife lost to foreclosure their home in Port Orange, Florida.

The person who pointed me to the SafeSport interim suspension listings was Sarah Ehekircher. This is fitting, since the same retirement route taken by Lochte was also the recent path of Scott MacFarland, the coach who is being re-investigated by SafeSport on Ehekircher’s well-documented allegations that he groomed and abused her as a teen swimmer, starting in Colorado in the 1980s.

 

Complete chronological leaks to the background of the Sarah Ehekircher case: http://concussioninc.net/?p=13125